Category: general

Germany -> Vietnam RT Donations

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Viet Nam News
The German Messer Industrial Gases Group’s Dr Hans Messer Foundation donated medical equipment valued at US$20,000 to the National Hospital for Obstetrics and Gynaecology’s Neonatal Department in Ha Noi yesterday.

The batch of five respiratory therapy or continuous positive air pressure (CPAP) machines, six phototherapy machines, three pulse oximeter monitors, three infant warmers and three incubators was presented by the group’s CEO, Stefan Messer.

The donation forms part of the Breath of Life programme of the non-governmental East Meet West (EMW) Foundation. The programme aims at reducing mortality rates among premature babies in Viet Nam. It is estimated that over 128,000 babies are born prematurely in Viet Nam each year and of those, 10 per cent suffer respiratory distress. About 12,000 babies will die and many more suffer brain damage from oxygen deprivation unless equipment, especially CPAP machines — standard equipment in developed countries — is available for intervention.

I like to see this kind of humanitarian donation.

Categories: general

Some RT Jobs from Synergy Staffing

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Position: Respiratory
Department/Area: Respiratory Therapy
Number of Openings: 15
Need Open: YES
Incentives Offered: NO
Shift: 12-hr shifts
Start Date: * ASAP
End Date: 3 months and 6 month assignments
Hiring Stage: Accepting profile/initial file submission
Certifications: AHA CPR
Comments/Requirements: PICU experience
Email your resume to info@synergystaffing.org

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Lung Games in Virginia

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This is a pretty cool idea:

Games Spotlight Healthy Lungs – News – Burke Connection – Connection Newspapers
This is the first Lung Games program in Virginia. “Our goal is to have these games throughout Virginia (at other lung rehab programs),” Montilla said.
Inova Fairfax has one of 23 lung rehabilitation programs in Virginia, Montilla said. Staff for it includes a pulmonologist, a nutritionist, a psychologist and several nurses and therapists.
Along with providing guided exercise to patients, the initial 10-week pulmonary rehabilitation program teaches patients how to use exercise machinery and medicines, and provide information about insurance policies for their disease. They also learn how to interpret their own pulmonary function data. Finally, they learn to control the panic that sometimes strikes when they have difficulty breathing.

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Preoperative Pulmonary Risk Stratification for Noncardiothoracic Surgery

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Summary for patients. Those Incentive Spirometry orders stand!

Preoperative Pulmonary Risk Stratification for Noncardiothoracic Surgery: Systematic Review for the American College of Physicians — Smetana et al. 144 (8): 581 — Annals of Internal Medicine
The authors found good evidence that the following patient factors increase the chances of pulmonary complications: older age, American Society of Anesthesiologists class II or higher, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, dependence on others for help with daily activities, and congestive heart failure. The authors also found good evidence that pulmonary complications are most common with aortic aneurysm repair, thoracic surgery, abdominal surgery, neurosurgery, vascular surgery, head and neck surgery, surgery lasting for more than 3 hours, emergency surgery, and general anesthesia. The only laboratory test result that predicted pulmonary complications was low serum albumin level (blood test that indicates poor nutritional status). The authors found good evidence that strategies to expand the lungs after surgery, such as deep breathing exercises, reduce the risk for pulmonary complications. They found fair evidence that selective use of a nasogastric tube (a tube passed through the nose to the stomach) for nausea, vomiting, or abdominal distention only reduces pulmonary complications after abdominal surgery. They found insufficient evidence to draw firm conclusions about the effectiveness of other strategies to reduce pulmonary complications.

Categories: general

Man Coughs Up Nail Stuck in Lung 35 Years

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Man Coughs Up Nail 35 Years After Accident
His family rushing him to the hospital with a 105-degree temperature. There, doctors found the culprit, a small nail that had dropped down inside Hart’s body cavity and nestled inside his ribcage.

Doses of penicillin helped Hart heal, but since removing the metal would require major surgery and doctors suspected the nail would seal itself off in Hart’s body, the foreign object was forgotten for years.

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it,” Hart said.

Years later, the nail turned up again on a doctor’s x-ray, but again, the unobtrusive item was left alone.

Then, three weeks ago, an internal camera captured an image of the nail during a routine doctor’s office visit. But it wasn’t in Hart’s ribcage area as he’d always thought — the object was actually in Hart’s lung. As Hart and his doctors made plans to remove the nail once and for all, natural physiology took over.

Apparently the mucociliary blanket is much tougher than I was led to believe.

Categories: general

ArtLung Blog : Archives : » Bronchoscope, 1993

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Bronchoscope, 1993

If I’d have had rhonchi.com up and running last year I’d have posted this here too:

ArtLung Blog : Archives : » Bronchoscope, 1993

At UVa I was one of the Respiratory Therapists on the bronchoscopy team. Basically we assisted on bronchoscopies for patients who needed to have their lungs looked at with fiber-optics. I assisted on some odd ones. I remember one very critically ill patient, their circulation was supported heavily with vasopressors and I think he was an ARDS on top of preexisting pulmonary fibrosis—the inside of their lungs seemed to be filled up with black tar. Really terrible. I worked the night shift at UVa, so there were no “day in day out” bronchoscopies, it was usually people who were very sick. The Pulmonologists were all really cool, and it was fun to be in that assist role. They want saline, you have the saline ready. We maintained the bronch cart and assured we were ready for anything. It was actually quite fun, despite the seriousness of the job.

Categories: general

RT to run for Alabama House of Reps

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RTs in politics!

Flott to run for House seat
Respiratory therapist Darren Flott announced that he’s making another bid to represent District 98 in the Alabama House of Representatives.

Flott, 40, ran for the position in 2002, losing to the longtime incumbent in a runoff.

The candidate, who said he lives in Eight Mile, is director of the respiratory therapy and cardiopulmonary departments at Atmore Community Hospital/Baptist Healthcare .

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Respiratory Therapists mentioned on WebMD Blog

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In my quest to find RT mentioning blogs I found this December webMD post about Respiratory Therapists. I like the bit about RT being in the basement. That was true of several hospitals I worked at, but by no means all.

If you are new to a community and have asthma or COPD and want to know the best pulmonary specialist for your care, I think that a local RT will steer you to the best pulmonologist, based on their experiences with most of the doctors in your new community. RTs are easily found by going to your local hospital and asking for the RT department (often in the basement, because that’s where the ventilators were traditionally stored).

Main WebMD link.

Categories: general